Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities

You have probably heard about these scarily named vulnerabilities which affect the most popular microprocessor chips used in most computers, they were announced publicly on 3rd January 2018.

This issue affects almost all computers of every type, from Apple to Windows via Linux, and is due to a problem with the hardware, not the operating system (but does not generally affect phones, tablets or other devices).

Brief service outage 11pm BST this evening (23 May 2019)

We will be performing maintenance this evening at some point between 11pm and midnight (UK time). This should result in less than minute's disruption to hosted services, and up to five minutes' outage in sending and receiving email. Please do not adjust your settings. Apologies for any inconvenience.

Update: Maintenance completed before midnight. Email outage was slightly longer than expected owing to having a new full-disk encryption system.

Service disruption Monday 20 May

Apologies to GreenNet users and site visitors for the downtime from 4pm today. An internal power problem affected several of our servers, particularly involving our email system and fileshare/cloud storage service.

All services should now be back to normal. If you're still seeing problems, please let us know, by email to support@gn.apc.org or phone 0330 355 4011. We're collectively looking at ways to learn from this incident to minimise future risks.

- the GreenNet collective.

Possible minor disruption, evening of Saturday 20 October

We are planning work on a router this evening between about 7pm and 9pm UK time. While we're switching between routing equipment it is possible that some websites, some private servers and file stores may be inaccessible for up to ten minutes. We will of course try to keep disruption to a minimum. Apologies for any inconvenience.

Update, Sunday 21 October: the work is complete. Interruption to affected services was well under a minute.

Got a LinkedIn account? Read this!

if you have an account at linkedin.com, your password is probably on sale to criminals.  Might you have used the same password anywhere else?  Then you will want change your password wherever you have used it.  In August 2016 there was a pattern of GreenNet email accounts being compromised and used to send spam.  It turned out people had reused their familiar GreenNet mail account passwords when setting up accounts on LinkedIn.  In 2012 117 million LinkedIn passwords were leaked and now four years